Lean learning cycle

A gap exists between measuring the external factors that triggered the portfolio initiatives and the success of delivering a solution to satisfy the desired outcome. In the software industry, a narrow view is often taken to assume the solution delivered immediately satisfied the customer demand. However, the question of return on investment (ROI) goes unanswered. Imagine investing in your 401(k) and never evaluating the return on your investments. The strategic PM can assume the responsibilities of the traditional project portfolio manager role to capture business metrics and communicate status with business leaders. Enterprise solutions require business metrics even when transforming into a lean and agile world.

This is a good question. First, one lifecycle clearly does not fit all. Teams find themselves in a unique situation: team members are unique individuals with their own skills and preferences for working, let alone the scaling/tailoring factors such as team size, geographic distribution, domain complexity, organizational culture, and so on which vary by team. Because teams find themselves in a wide variety of situations shouldn’t a framework such as DA support several lifecycles? Furthermore, just from the raging debates on various agile discussion forums, in agile user groups, at agile conferences, and even within organizations themselves it’s very easy to empirically observe that agile teams are in fact following different types of lifecycles.

Progress in manufacturing is measured by the production of high quality goods. The unit of progress for Lean Startups is validated learning-a rigorous method for demonstrating progress when one is embedded in the soil of extreme uncertainty. Once entrepreneurs embrace validated learning, the development process can shrink substantially. When you focus on figuring the right thing to build-the thing customers want and will pay for-you need not spend months waiting for a product beta launch to change the company's direction. Instead, entrepreneurs can adapt their plans incrementally, inch by inch, minute by minute.

Pull systems are a nice way to control production between processes that cannot be tied together in a continuous flow, but sometimes it is not piratical to keep and inventory of all possible part variations in a pull-system supermarket .  Examples include custom parts, parts that have a short shelf life, and costly parts that are used infrequently.  In some of these cases you can use a  FIFO (“first-in-first-out”) lane between two decoupled processes to substitute for a supermarket and maintain a flow between them.  Think of a FIFO lane like a chute that con hold only a certain amount of inventory, with the supplying process at the chute entrance and the customer process at the exit.  If the FIFO lane gets full, the supplying process  must stop producing until the customer has used up some of the inventory.

I am working on implementing OEE in one of our machines that makes centertubes for automotive oil filters. The steel is rolled and each part number has specific diameter and length. However, the run-rates vary for each part numbers. I am somewhat able to calculate Takt time for each part number based on the standard run-rate. However, the problem for me is to determine Ideal Cycle Time. The machine can run as fast as 65 PPM for one part number while it runs as slow as 13 PPM for some other part number. In this case, what would be the optimal way to calculate Ideal Cycle Time for each part numbers? As you know, Ideal Cycle time is required to calculate Performance Metric of OEE.

Lean learning cycle

lean learning cycle

Pull systems are a nice way to control production between processes that cannot be tied together in a continuous flow, but sometimes it is not piratical to keep and inventory of all possible part variations in a pull-system supermarket .  Examples include custom parts, parts that have a short shelf life, and costly parts that are used infrequently.  In some of these cases you can use a  FIFO (“first-in-first-out”) lane between two decoupled processes to substitute for a supermarket and maintain a flow between them.  Think of a FIFO lane like a chute that con hold only a certain amount of inventory, with the supplying process at the chute entrance and the customer process at the exit.  If the FIFO lane gets full, the supplying process  must stop producing until the customer has used up some of the inventory.

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